The truth about low vision rehab

“I wish I had known about you earlier”

We hear this a lot from our patients after they have completed low vision rehab services. They are thrilled to engage in meaningful activities again, like reading and using the computer. They are less reliant on others for everyday tasks, such as cooking and taking medications. More importantly, they know vision rehab services are available to provide support on their journey with vision loss.

Most people have little experience with low vision rehab. Thus, our mission is to not only provide excellent services for our patients, but also to increase awareness regarding vision loss and rehab services. To start, we created a list of low vision rehab facts and myths. Thank you for reading!

Low vision rehabilitation: Facts and Myths

MYTH

Low vision rehab is only for people who are blind and need cane and Braille training.

FACT

Low vision rehab is for persons that have some remaining vision that cannot be fully corrected with glasses.

MYTH

Persons with low vision have difficulty with reading but they can do everything else.

FACT

Low vision is a physical impairment that can cause serious functional limitations. Examples: identifying medications, monitoring a medical condition such as blood pressure or blood sugar, navigating steps without falling, and cooking balanced meals without cutting or burning themselves.

MYTH

Low vision services are costly to the consumer.

FACT

Low vision occupational therapy is covered by Medicare and most commercial insurances. It may enable someone to remain in their home rather than an assisted living facility. It may also prevent more costly medical conditions due to better medical management.

MYTH

Low vision occupational therapy is simply “sharing tips and pointers” on how to make things more visible.

FACT

Occupational therapists (OTs) with advanced training in vision rehab have in depth knowledge of eye conditions. They understand how different conditions may impact one’s ability to complete tasks. They help patients use their remaining vision in the best way possible. OTs are also skilled with adapting techniques to work with other problems or medical conditions.

 


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